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Finding the Right Watering Tools for Your Yard

by Allison E. Beatty, All About Lawns Columnist

Watering your lawn, shrubs and flowers is a lot more complicated than it sounds. You want to make sure the water is reaching the right parts of the grass and garden without missing or over-watering other areas. Here's a look at how to select garden waterers.
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Common Gardening Waterers

The most common garden waterers are sprinklers, wands, hand sprayers and drip hoses. Here's a look at each of these gardening tools:
  • Sprinklers come in a variety of sizes and shapes. Some move water in an arc, while others turn in a circle. Look for one that waters grass and flowers in the direction that is most efficient. For example, if you have a wide flower bed, get a sprinkler with a wide stream. This way you'll be able to move the sprinkler less often.
  • Wands are long, straight waterers that attach to a hose, typically with a shutoff valve at the base. These tools are ideal for Watering hanging baskets and other hard to reach sections of the yard.
  • Hand sprayers screw onto the hose and let you hold the equipment and point the waterer in the desired direction.
  • Drip hoses are placed in a yard to let water drip out slowly. These are designed for watering trees and shrubs, as they direct water slowly to the roots.

Examine Watering Needs

The trick to buying the right gardening tools and waterers for your yard is to understand your plant and lawn requirements. For example:
  • For perennial beds, buy a small sprinkler, a drip hose or a wand. A large sprinkler will also soak surrounding shrubs and lawn.
  • For trees, try a soaker hose or sprinkler that can be adjusted to send water near the ground. Too much overhead watering wastes water, diverting water from the roots, where it is needed.

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About the Author
Allison E. Beatty is a syndicated real estate writer and founder of the Web site Renovator's Place. She has been a writer of home improvement columns for 15 years. Her articles have appeared in numerous national newspapers and magazines, and on home improvement Web sites.



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